Campaigners urge government to act on children’s wellbeing

A new UK mental health charity has called for more to be done to support children’s mental health after a YouGov poll indicated that one in five children show symptoms of depression, the BBC reports. The story follows increasing concerns (which we reported here) about young people’s mental health in the UK and internationally.

Mindfull, an online mentoring and counselling service for 11-17 year olds launched today by the BeatBullying Group, has urged that mental health needs to be added to school curriculums, but there are question marks about where the expertise to deliver such classes could come from. Since 2000, schools in the UK have been expected to teach children about mental health through PSHE, but the program has been criticised for neglecting mental health, and an Ofsted report in May noted that PSHE teachers were lacking “subject-specific training and support.”

There are a number of British schools – notably, Wellington College – that deliver emotional wellbeing classes, and in 2007, 90 teachers in schools across three regions were trained to deliver classes in emotional resilience as part of a pilot programme backed by the Department for Education – although it was not rolled out beyond the pilot. The government is yet to make further commitments to funding mental health training in schools.

The YouGov poll, which, according to reports, also indicates that a third of young people have considered suicide, raises questions about the causes of children’s mental health problems. Earlier this year, Peter Tait, head of Sherborne Preparatory School in Dorset, suggested that students’ wellbeing was being damaged by excessive emphasis on grades. It’s an issue that’s being recognised in other countries. Last week it was reported that educational reforms in China are set to shift emphasis away from testing over concerns about the impact that narrow methods of evaluation were having on students’ mental health.

In 2005 the UK’s Department for Education introduced SEAL in primary schools, which encourages a “whole school approach to promoting social and emotional skills”, but a 2010 report from the Department of Education showed mixed results, and concerns have been raised recently that the government’s emphasis on exam results has been pressuring schools to give up SEAL.

Note: Free resources for teachers wanting to deliver mental health classes are available through Young Minds, here. Children and parents concerned about mental health can also access information and helpline details through Young Minds. Further resources and information about mental health, and helplines, are available through Mind

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